northamericansounddiaries:

Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System -  Sound Diary

Based around a recent trip to the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California, this diary includes the drive up to the facility and sounds recorded by the perimeter fence. 

Ivanpah generates electricity with 1000’s of computer controlled mirrors programmed to move with the sun and reflect sunlight onto three huge water towers, the heat converts the water to steam, this moves turbines generating electricity. Ivanpah opened in February 2014 and powers 140,000 homes. 

When I walked up to the mirrors I found that they made some really interesting sounds. An electronic tone signals each movement of the mirrors, this is followed by the actual mechanical movement of the mirrors which sounds like creaking floorboards.     

It would be interesting to have gone closer and recorded the steam powered turbines but the facility was closed off so I couldn’t go further than the perimeter fence. 

The sound diary can be found here: https://soundcloud.com/dan-tapper-sound-design/ivanpah-solar-electric

* In the diary I say there are millions of mirrors, the actual figure is 170,000 mirrors. My response came from the sheer awesomeness of the site. 

More information on Ivanpah can be found here: http://ivanpahsolar.com/ northamericansounddiaries:

Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System -  Sound Diary

Based around a recent trip to the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California, this diary includes the drive up to the facility and sounds recorded by the perimeter fence. 

Ivanpah generates electricity with 1000’s of computer controlled mirrors programmed to move with the sun and reflect sunlight onto three huge water towers, the heat converts the water to steam, this moves turbines generating electricity. Ivanpah opened in February 2014 and powers 140,000 homes. 

When I walked up to the mirrors I found that they made some really interesting sounds. An electronic tone signals each movement of the mirrors, this is followed by the actual mechanical movement of the mirrors which sounds like creaking floorboards.     

It would be interesting to have gone closer and recorded the steam powered turbines but the facility was closed off so I couldn’t go further than the perimeter fence. 

The sound diary can be found here: https://soundcloud.com/dan-tapper-sound-design/ivanpah-solar-electric

* In the diary I say there are millions of mirrors, the actual figure is 170,000 mirrors. My response came from the sheer awesomeness of the site. 

More information on Ivanpah can be found here: http://ivanpahsolar.com/ northamericansounddiaries:

Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System -  Sound Diary

Based around a recent trip to the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California, this diary includes the drive up to the facility and sounds recorded by the perimeter fence. 

Ivanpah generates electricity with 1000’s of computer controlled mirrors programmed to move with the sun and reflect sunlight onto three huge water towers, the heat converts the water to steam, this moves turbines generating electricity. Ivanpah opened in February 2014 and powers 140,000 homes. 

When I walked up to the mirrors I found that they made some really interesting sounds. An electronic tone signals each movement of the mirrors, this is followed by the actual mechanical movement of the mirrors which sounds like creaking floorboards.     

It would be interesting to have gone closer and recorded the steam powered turbines but the facility was closed off so I couldn’t go further than the perimeter fence. 

The sound diary can be found here: https://soundcloud.com/dan-tapper-sound-design/ivanpah-solar-electric

* In the diary I say there are millions of mirrors, the actual figure is 170,000 mirrors. My response came from the sheer awesomeness of the site. 

More information on Ivanpah can be found here: http://ivanpahsolar.com/

northamericansounddiaries:

Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System - Sound Diary

Based around a recent trip to the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California, this diary includes the drive up to the facility and sounds recorded by the perimeter fence.

Ivanpah generates electricity with 1000’s of computer controlled mirrors programmed to move with the sun and reflect sunlight onto three huge water towers, the heat converts the water to steam, this moves turbines generating electricity. Ivanpah opened in February 2014 and powers 140,000 homes.

When I walked up to the mirrors I found that they made some really interesting sounds. An electronic tone signals each movement of the mirrors, this is followed by the actual mechanical movement of the mirrors which sounds like creaking floorboards.

It would be interesting to have gone closer and recorded the steam powered turbines but the facility was closed off so I couldn’t go further than the perimeter fence.

The sound diary can be found here: https://soundcloud.com/dan-tapper-sound-design/ivanpah-solar-electric

* In the diary I say there are millions of mirrors, the actual figure is 170,000 mirrors. My response came from the sheer awesomeness of the site.

More information on Ivanpah can be found here: http://ivanpahsolar.com/

northamericansounddiaries:

Creaking Bushes in the Talbert Nature Preserve, Banning Channel Bikeway along the Santa Ana River and the sounds of sandstorms and Least Terns between Newport and Huntington Beach

The last five days of my trip have been spent near Newport Beach, CA, next to a nature preserve called the Talbert Nature Preserve. My time here has been spent walking and exploring the surrounding area. Walking through the park I came across a variety of interesting plants and birds. A sound that particular interested me here was a large patch of bushes that when blown by the wind made a creaking noise reminiscent of dragging wet shoes over a polished wooden floor. I stayed, listened and recorded the bush over a ten minute period and in that time got the sense of quite a diverse sound landscape. The area was near the flightpath of several small aircraft generating large amounts of noise juxtaposing the quietness of the park, the park borders onto a cycle path undergoing maintenance and at times I could hear the sound of repair trucks beeping. These sounds paired with the wind, bush creaking and bird life of the park created what I find to be a very interesting soundscape of nature and man living side by side. 

From the Nature Preserve I walked onto the Banning Channel Bikeway, along the bikeway I found a number of metallic beads connected at intervals to the metal fence. These were being blown by the wind creating a very haunting sound, reminding me of hearing a ships bell playing from a distance. On the journey down to the beach I passed by the nest of a Red Tailed Hawk (complete with hawk) and a colony of Least Terns which I spent some time recording. 

I walked along the beach by the sea line between Newport and Huntington beach, this was about  6 miles. Along the way I saw pelicans, a sea lion and lots of seagulls. The whole day was incredibly windy so there was lots of sand whipped up along the beach creating sandstorms and hazy vision. I got a really cool recording of the blown sand skittering along the beach front. 

I don’t currently have my computer with me so I haven’t been able to post any audio but I hope to post some sounds soon. northamericansounddiaries:

Creaking Bushes in the Talbert Nature Preserve, Banning Channel Bikeway along the Santa Ana River and the sounds of sandstorms and Least Terns between Newport and Huntington Beach

The last five days of my trip have been spent near Newport Beach, CA, next to a nature preserve called the Talbert Nature Preserve. My time here has been spent walking and exploring the surrounding area. Walking through the park I came across a variety of interesting plants and birds. A sound that particular interested me here was a large patch of bushes that when blown by the wind made a creaking noise reminiscent of dragging wet shoes over a polished wooden floor. I stayed, listened and recorded the bush over a ten minute period and in that time got the sense of quite a diverse sound landscape. The area was near the flightpath of several small aircraft generating large amounts of noise juxtaposing the quietness of the park, the park borders onto a cycle path undergoing maintenance and at times I could hear the sound of repair trucks beeping. These sounds paired with the wind, bush creaking and bird life of the park created what I find to be a very interesting soundscape of nature and man living side by side. 

From the Nature Preserve I walked onto the Banning Channel Bikeway, along the bikeway I found a number of metallic beads connected at intervals to the metal fence. These were being blown by the wind creating a very haunting sound, reminding me of hearing a ships bell playing from a distance. On the journey down to the beach I passed by the nest of a Red Tailed Hawk (complete with hawk) and a colony of Least Terns which I spent some time recording. 

I walked along the beach by the sea line between Newport and Huntington beach, this was about  6 miles. Along the way I saw pelicans, a sea lion and lots of seagulls. The whole day was incredibly windy so there was lots of sand whipped up along the beach creating sandstorms and hazy vision. I got a really cool recording of the blown sand skittering along the beach front. 

I don’t currently have my computer with me so I haven’t been able to post any audio but I hope to post some sounds soon. northamericansounddiaries:

Creaking Bushes in the Talbert Nature Preserve, Banning Channel Bikeway along the Santa Ana River and the sounds of sandstorms and Least Terns between Newport and Huntington Beach

The last five days of my trip have been spent near Newport Beach, CA, next to a nature preserve called the Talbert Nature Preserve. My time here has been spent walking and exploring the surrounding area. Walking through the park I came across a variety of interesting plants and birds. A sound that particular interested me here was a large patch of bushes that when blown by the wind made a creaking noise reminiscent of dragging wet shoes over a polished wooden floor. I stayed, listened and recorded the bush over a ten minute period and in that time got the sense of quite a diverse sound landscape. The area was near the flightpath of several small aircraft generating large amounts of noise juxtaposing the quietness of the park, the park borders onto a cycle path undergoing maintenance and at times I could hear the sound of repair trucks beeping. These sounds paired with the wind, bush creaking and bird life of the park created what I find to be a very interesting soundscape of nature and man living side by side. 

From the Nature Preserve I walked onto the Banning Channel Bikeway, along the bikeway I found a number of metallic beads connected at intervals to the metal fence. These were being blown by the wind creating a very haunting sound, reminding me of hearing a ships bell playing from a distance. On the journey down to the beach I passed by the nest of a Red Tailed Hawk (complete with hawk) and a colony of Least Terns which I spent some time recording. 

I walked along the beach by the sea line between Newport and Huntington beach, this was about  6 miles. Along the way I saw pelicans, a sea lion and lots of seagulls. The whole day was incredibly windy so there was lots of sand whipped up along the beach creating sandstorms and hazy vision. I got a really cool recording of the blown sand skittering along the beach front. 

I don’t currently have my computer with me so I haven’t been able to post any audio but I hope to post some sounds soon. northamericansounddiaries:

Creaking Bushes in the Talbert Nature Preserve, Banning Channel Bikeway along the Santa Ana River and the sounds of sandstorms and Least Terns between Newport and Huntington Beach

The last five days of my trip have been spent near Newport Beach, CA, next to a nature preserve called the Talbert Nature Preserve. My time here has been spent walking and exploring the surrounding area. Walking through the park I came across a variety of interesting plants and birds. A sound that particular interested me here was a large patch of bushes that when blown by the wind made a creaking noise reminiscent of dragging wet shoes over a polished wooden floor. I stayed, listened and recorded the bush over a ten minute period and in that time got the sense of quite a diverse sound landscape. The area was near the flightpath of several small aircraft generating large amounts of noise juxtaposing the quietness of the park, the park borders onto a cycle path undergoing maintenance and at times I could hear the sound of repair trucks beeping. These sounds paired with the wind, bush creaking and bird life of the park created what I find to be a very interesting soundscape of nature and man living side by side. 

From the Nature Preserve I walked onto the Banning Channel Bikeway, along the bikeway I found a number of metallic beads connected at intervals to the metal fence. These were being blown by the wind creating a very haunting sound, reminding me of hearing a ships bell playing from a distance. On the journey down to the beach I passed by the nest of a Red Tailed Hawk (complete with hawk) and a colony of Least Terns which I spent some time recording. 

I walked along the beach by the sea line between Newport and Huntington beach, this was about  6 miles. Along the way I saw pelicans, a sea lion and lots of seagulls. The whole day was incredibly windy so there was lots of sand whipped up along the beach creating sandstorms and hazy vision. I got a really cool recording of the blown sand skittering along the beach front. 

I don’t currently have my computer with me so I haven’t been able to post any audio but I hope to post some sounds soon.

northamericansounddiaries:

Creaking Bushes in the Talbert Nature Preserve, Banning Channel Bikeway along the Santa Ana River and the sounds of sandstorms and Least Terns between Newport and Huntington Beach

The last five days of my trip have been spent near Newport Beach, CA, next to a nature preserve called the Talbert Nature Preserve. My time here has been spent walking and exploring the surrounding area. Walking through the park I came across a variety of interesting plants and birds. A sound that particular interested me here was a large patch of bushes that when blown by the wind made a creaking noise reminiscent of dragging wet shoes over a polished wooden floor. I stayed, listened and recorded the bush over a ten minute period and in that time got the sense of quite a diverse sound landscape. The area was near the flightpath of several small aircraft generating large amounts of noise juxtaposing the quietness of the park, the park borders onto a cycle path undergoing maintenance and at times I could hear the sound of repair trucks beeping. These sounds paired with the wind, bush creaking and bird life of the park created what I find to be a very interesting soundscape of nature and man living side by side.

From the Nature Preserve I walked onto the Banning Channel Bikeway, along the bikeway I found a number of metallic beads connected at intervals to the metal fence. These were being blown by the wind creating a very haunting sound, reminding me of hearing a ships bell playing from a distance. On the journey down to the beach I passed by the nest of a Red Tailed Hawk (complete with hawk) and a colony of Least Terns which I spent some time recording.

I walked along the beach by the sea line between Newport and Huntington beach, this was about 6 miles. Along the way I saw pelicans, a sea lion and lots of seagulls. The whole day was incredibly windy so there was lots of sand whipped up along the beach creating sandstorms and hazy vision. I got a really cool recording of the blown sand skittering along the beach front.

I don’t currently have my computer with me so I haven’t been able to post any audio but I hope to post some sounds soon.

colliderblog:

Be sure to check out this great Art / Science publication called + - 

Their first issue focuses on Microscopy. Follow their tumblr here:  Plus Minus Magazine

thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 
thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 

thedolab:

Do Andy Goldsworthy’s beautiful ice and snow sculptures give you chills? 

(via sleepyhan)

jtotheizzoe:

Selected stanzas from John Frederick Nims’ poem The Six-Cornered Snowflake, an ode to Kepler and distilling beauty from nature, even if that beauty is doomed to disappear in the hand that studies it.
It’s almost certainly the best thing I’ve ever read about snowflakes, or maybe anything.
(via Malcolm Campbell) jtotheizzoe:

Selected stanzas from John Frederick Nims’ poem The Six-Cornered Snowflake, an ode to Kepler and distilling beauty from nature, even if that beauty is doomed to disappear in the hand that studies it.
It’s almost certainly the best thing I’ve ever read about snowflakes, or maybe anything.
(via Malcolm Campbell) jtotheizzoe:

Selected stanzas from John Frederick Nims’ poem The Six-Cornered Snowflake, an ode to Kepler and distilling beauty from nature, even if that beauty is doomed to disappear in the hand that studies it.
It’s almost certainly the best thing I’ve ever read about snowflakes, or maybe anything.
(via Malcolm Campbell)

jtotheizzoe:

Selected stanzas from John Frederick Nims’ poem The Six-Cornered Snowflake, an ode to Kepler and distilling beauty from nature, even if that beauty is doomed to disappear in the hand that studies it.

It’s almost certainly the best thing I’ve ever read about snowflakes, or maybe anything.

(via Malcolm Campbell)

asapscience:

A discovery of conjoined whales. 

Scientists at Mexico’s Laguna Ojo de Liebre have discovered the remains of recently deceased conjoined Grey whales, the first conjoined Grey whales ever discovered. 

More at io9: http://bit.ly/1dg4wTQ

Woooooow.

jtotheizzoe:

fer1972:

Artworks made of insect pins, pinning foam, photographic prints, paint samples, glass vials, test tubes, magnifying boxes, dried flower, gelatin capsules, fabric samples, jewelry beads, sequins, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread and other assorted stuff by Michael Mapes

Wow, there’s “art made of science” and there’s ART MADE OF SCIENCE jtotheizzoe:

fer1972:

Artworks made of insect pins, pinning foam, photographic prints, paint samples, glass vials, test tubes, magnifying boxes, dried flower, gelatin capsules, fabric samples, jewelry beads, sequins, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread and other assorted stuff by Michael Mapes

Wow, there’s “art made of science” and there’s ART MADE OF SCIENCE jtotheizzoe:

fer1972:

Artworks made of insect pins, pinning foam, photographic prints, paint samples, glass vials, test tubes, magnifying boxes, dried flower, gelatin capsules, fabric samples, jewelry beads, sequins, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread and other assorted stuff by Michael Mapes

Wow, there’s “art made of science” and there’s ART MADE OF SCIENCE jtotheizzoe:

fer1972:

Artworks made of insect pins, pinning foam, photographic prints, paint samples, glass vials, test tubes, magnifying boxes, dried flower, gelatin capsules, fabric samples, jewelry beads, sequins, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread and other assorted stuff by Michael Mapes

Wow, there’s “art made of science” and there’s ART MADE OF SCIENCE jtotheizzoe:

fer1972:

Artworks made of insect pins, pinning foam, photographic prints, paint samples, glass vials, test tubes, magnifying boxes, dried flower, gelatin capsules, fabric samples, jewelry beads, sequins, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread and other assorted stuff by Michael Mapes

Wow, there’s “art made of science” and there’s ART MADE OF SCIENCE

jtotheizzoe:

fer1972:

Artworks made of insect pins, pinning foam, photographic prints, paint samples, glass vials, test tubes, magnifying boxes, dried flower, gelatin capsules, fabric samples, jewelry beads, sequins, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread and other assorted stuff by Michael Mapes

Wow, there’s “art made of science” and there’s ART MADE OF SCIENCE

This is so awesome.

i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site. i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site. i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site. i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site. i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site. i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site. i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty
As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.
This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.
These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site.

i-heart-histo:

Hidden Beauty

As we have seen in the short life of my little blog, histology of fatal diseases can look as beautiful as a Van Gogh, as vibrant as a Matisse or as startlingly abstract as a Pollock. The images above are a sample of histology images taken by the medical scientists who work with devastatingly dazzling tissue biopsies and samples at John Hopkins’ School of Medicine.

This is histology forcing us to confront the fascinating beauty of some of the most frightening pathological diagnoses that appear so destructively beautiful - hidden within us.

These images are published alongside many more in a book entitled “Hidden Beauty: exploring the aesthetics of medical science” and can be seen at the book’s site.